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4.13 First Aid, Home Remedies and Prescribed Medicines

RELATED CHAPTERS

This guidance should be read in conjunction with First Aid, Home Remedies and Prescribed Medicines Procedure.


Contents

  1. Reception and Administering of Prescribed Medication/Drugs
  2. Reception and Administering of Non-Prescribed Medication/Drugs
  3. Home Remedies
  4. Home Remedies List


1. Reception and Administering of Prescribed Medication/Drugs

The following guidance applies to the reception and administration of prescribed medicines.

  1. When receiving medication, check the dosage and times that the medication is to be given.
  2. Check that there is a suitable amount of the medication available and the expiry date.
  3. Check that the name of the child is on the container; if the name on the container is different, the medication cannot be administered.
  4. Unless it is agreed that the child will store and administer the medication, it must be stored in a place out of reach from children, preferably in a locked cabinet.
  5. The fact that it has been stored must be recorded and the record must be signed and dated by the person receiving/storing it.
  6. Staff/carers should not normally be expected to administer medication that requires assistance from a nurse or involves intimate contact with the child, such as suppositories, unless they have received training and consent has been given.
  7. Before administering the medication, check relevant records to ensure it has not already been given.
  8. Children should not be administered both prescribed and non-prescribed medication unless advice has been obtained from their pharmacist or GP that it is safe to do so.
  9. When removing medication from locked cabinets, ensure that the cabinet is locked if left unsupervised.
  10. Confirm that the name on the container is the child’s. It is not acceptable to administer prescribed medication other than to the person it is prescribed for.
  11. Measure and administer the dose as required; and observe, if possible, that it has been taken.
  12. Note and account for warnings provided, such as ‘may cause drowsiness’.      
  13. The child may refuse the medicine; if so, it must never be forced or the child tricked into taking it.
  14. Do not mix medication into drinks or food and do not crush tablets or capsules unless advised to do so.
  15. The administration (or refusal) must be recorded and the record signed and dated by the staff member administering.
  16. Return the container to the locked cabinet, record that the medication has been administered.


2. Reception and Administering of Non-Prescribed Medication/Drugs

  1. Although no prescription is required, Aspirin and Aspirin products may not be administered to a child unless prescribed by a medical practitioner.
  2. Other non-prescribed medicines may not be administered unless there is consent from the parent(s) or child over the age of sixteen.
  3. Non-prescribed medicines may only be obtained from reputable Pharmacists.
  4. Unless it is agreed that the child will store and administer the medication, it must be stored in a place out of reach from children, preferably in a locked cabinet.
  5. The fact that it has been stored must be recorded and the record must be signed and dated by the person receiving it.
  6. Before administering non-prescribed medicines, check the expiry date; also check relevant records to ensure it has not already been given.
  7. Children should not be administered both prescribed and non-prescribed medication unless advice has been received from their pharmacist or GP that it is safe to do so.
  8. When removing medication from locked cabinets, ensure that the cabinet is locked if left unsupervised.
  9. Measure and administer the dose as required; and observe if possible that it has been taken.
  10. The administration (or refusal) must be recorded and the record signed and dated by the staff member administering.
  11. Return the container to the locked cabinet, record that the medication has been administered.


3. Home Remedies

Home Remedies are medicines, suitable for children, which can be bought ‘over the counter’, without prescription, including Paracetamol.

The Home Remedies listed below are the only remedies that may be used by children, unless others have been authorised by a medical practitioner - in writing. For dosages, follow manufacturers directions or seek advice of a medical practitioner or pharmacist.


4. Home Remedies List

Symptom Remedy
For dry coughs

SIMPLE LINCTUS
Not suitable for diabetics

PAVACOL D LINCTUS
Suitable for diabetics

For chesty coughs The GP should be contacted
For nasal congestion

AROMATIC INHALATIONS
(e.g. Karvol capsules, methol crystals, menthol and eucalyptus inhalation, or similar). Use as a steam inhalation using hot, not boiling, water

For diarrhoea ORAL REHYDRATION SALTS
(e.g. Dioralyte, Electrolade, Rehidrat)
Follow manufacturers directions on the pack for making up, and the dose.
For constipation GLYCERIN SUPPOSITORIES
For indigestion MAGNESIUM TRISILICATE MIXTURE
For sore throat GLYCERIN, LEMON AND HONEY LOZENGES
Suck as required
For pain PARACETAMOL TABLETS

End